Whining

Whining

Loomis students complain so much that it’s practically a second nature. Almost everyone, especially I, grumble so much that grumbling has become the norm. But I don’t think that it’s necessarily just a Loomis problem, I think that it’s a high-school-student problem. From what I’ve seen, high school students, in their most rash, adolescent state of mind, simply like to oppose to everything. I’m not trying to justify their complaining, but I do think that the high stress and little sleep that have become normal for high school students do take a toll, and it’s only natural to complain.

I have a couple theories about why we whine so much. As I said, we are all stressed. I think that one way I deal with my stress is through expressing discontent. I find that after I agonize over something, even just in passing remarks, I do feel slightly better. Another theory that came to light after my conversion with my friend Marleigh is that whining helps one relate to others. If you are with someone that you aren’t very close with, and he/she complains about being really tired, a natural response might be to also carp about how tired you are; that way you can keep the conversation going. Another situation where whining might help is when you’re walking to a class with someone you aren’t very close with, and the weather is really humid, or pouring rain. A natural comment to fill the awkward silence would be to bemoan the weather. This means that complaints and dissatisfaction are all convenient conversation topics to have with someone you don’t really know because both parties can relate and connect to some degree.

One thing that I am almost certain of is that a lot of the things that we complain about are not really worth complaining about. My common lamentations often pertain to, in no particular order, being tired, the van to Loomis being too hot, outside being too cold, teachers being unreasonable, dining hall food, first lunch being crowded, Wi-Fi being too slow, being bad at the clarinet, being bad at geometry, never having a free, being thirsty, and the list could probably go on. Just writing this makes me feel disappointed in myself, not only because I complain so much, but also because most of these complaints are unnecessary. The van wouldn’t be so hot if I wasn’t lazy and took off my coat or asked the driver to turn the heat down. I bewail the cold because I don’t wear enough warm clothes. I whine about being hungry when I’m not even hungry and I just want food. My Wi-Fi would be faster if I actually updated my laptop, and I would be better at the clarinet if I practiced more than once a week. I’m explaining all of this to hopefully emphasize that although we complain a lot, at least half of our grievances are probably unjustified.

This isn’t a plea to make everyone at Loomis stop complaining. Nowhere will we ever achieve that perfection, and I find the thought of such a world to be boring. Complaining can sometimes trigger positive changes and bridge commonality. But just a thought- maybe we could work to limit our pointless whining.